ticks and tick-transmitted icks 

Vector graphic of a tick

Tick control, prevention, and treatment for puppies and kittens, cats and dogs 

Ticks love to latch on and suck blood from you and your pets, potentially transmitting diseases like Lyme disease, Ehrlichiosis, Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, and others with every bite. We’re here for love, health, and year-round flea and tick protection for your pet. Talk to your veterinary team about the right tick control options for your pet’s age, location, and lifestyle. 

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If you’ve recently found a tick on your dog or cat, and you’re concerned they may have Lyme or other tick-transmitted disease, it’s time to see the vet.

A close-up of a tick on a pet's skin

Ticks are blood-sucking machines

Just seeing a tick on your pet can be upsetting — female ticks can expand up to 10 times when feeding. Even so, they can be hard to spot under fur so, we’ve got tips for finding and removing the nasty buggos.

How to spot and remove ticks on your pet
A dog laying down in his bed

Ticks transmit dangerous diseases

Tick prevention doesn’t just help your pet avoid being a tick meal ticket. Infected ticks inject bacteria and other organisms directly into the bloodstream, spreading Lyme disease and more.

Read more about tick-transmitted diseases
A 'Beware of Ticks' sign in the woods

Ticks can be terrible all year long

You may associate ticks with summer grass, but many ticks are actually more active during the winter. That’s why we recommend lifelong, year-round parasite control to help protect your pet against bites and disease.

A fully engorged tick looks like a plump little blood-filled bean.

Owner holding dog on shoulder

Top 3 tips for preventing ticks

  1. Prevent them from latching onto your pet with the right flea and tick protection.
  2. Do regular tick checks on your pet after walks through tall grass, woods, or other tick-tastic locations.
  3. Groom your pet regularly, checking through their fur and hair for any unwanted passengers. Plus, bathing can help you get hands-on with skin, too.  

See more on bathing pets

Two young female veterinarians examining a dog's ear at the Banfield Pet Hospital

Parasite protection for dogs

Dogs don’t just get fleas and ticks. Intestinal parasites and skin mites can also keep your pet from being happy and healthy. From hookworms to heartworms, tapeworms, scabies, and more, we can help to protect and treat your BFF.

A male veterinarian examining a cat at the Banfield Pet Hospital

Parasite protection for cats

Cats need protection against fleas and ticks — plus help with deworming and mites. We can help keep your kittyBAE from being a bug buffet with protection against intestinal worms, ear mites, and other nasty parasites.

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Optimum Wellness Plans® 

Affordable packages of smart, high-quality preventive petcare to help keep your pet happy and healthy.
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